Common Causes of Knee Pain and When to Seek Treatment

Knee injuries cause knee pain, especially for athletes. There are four major ligaments of the knee: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Also, the meniscus is commonly injured, resulting in knee pain. Other causes of knee pain include Osgood-Schlatter Disease and Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain.

Omaha Integrated Health is a state-of-the-art wellness center that offers an integrated approach to health and healing. Our experienced professionals use the latest techniques and technologies to help you achieve your goals. Whether you’re looking to reduce pain, improve your energy level, or just feel better overall, Omaha Integrated Health can help. Call us today!

ACL Injury

The ACL extends from the front of the tibia and inserts on the back of the femur. This structure prevents excessive posterior movement of the femur on the tibia. The ACL is often torn when an athlete changes direction rapidly, slows down from running, or lands wrong from a jump. These types of injuries are common for athletes who ski, play basketball, or play football. The pain associated with a torn ACL is rated as moderate to severe and is typically described as sharp at first, and then throbbing or achy as the knee begins to swell. Most people report increased pain with bending or straightening of the knee.

If you’re looking for a knee specialist in Omaha, NE, look no further than Omaha Integrated Health. We offer comprehensive care for all types of knee pain, from sports injuries to arthritis. Our team of experts will work with you to develop a treatment plan that meets your needs and helps you get back to your everyday life. Contact us today to schedule an appointment!

PCL injury
PCL injuries are much less common compared to ACL injuries. The PCL is often injured when an athlete receives a blow to the front of the lower leg, just below the knee or makes a simple misstep on the playing field. The PCL prevents the tibia from sliding backwards and works with the ACL to prevent pivoting of the knee. The symptoms of a PCL tear include knee pain, decreased motion, and swelling.

Knee pain can be debilitating, preventing you from doing the things you love. If you’re looking for relief, Omaha Integrated Health can help. We offer comprehensive treatment plans tailored to your specific needs, so you can get back to living life to the fullest. Contact us today to schedule a consultation!

MCL Injury

Most injuries to the MCL are the result of a direct blow to the outside of the knee. Athletes who play soccer or football are at increased risk for this type of injury. The MCL spans the distance from the top of the tibia to the end of the femur on the inside of the knee. This structure prevents widening of the inside of the joint. A torn MCL causes swelling over the ligament, bruising, and feeling that the knee will give out or buckle.

LCL Injury

The LCL connects the end of the femur to the top of the fibula (the smaller shin bone). It is located on the outer aspect of the knee. The LCL helps to prevent unnecessary side-to-side movement of the knee joint. The LCL is usually torn from traumatic falls, motor vehicle accidents, or during sporting activities. Symptoms of a torn LCL depend on the severity of the tear and include pain, swelling, difficulty bending the knee, and instability of the joint.

Torn Meniscus

The meniscus is the rubbery, tough cartilage that sits between the femur and the tibia. This structure works as a shock absorber. Athletes are at risk for tears in this cartilage with cutting, pivoting, twisting, decelerating, or being tackled. There are two menisci of the knee and they lie between the femur and tibia, one on the inside and one on the outside of the joint. The symptoms of a meniscus tear include knee pain, swelling, popping sound within the knee, and limited motion of the joint.

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Osgood-Schlatter disease is an overuse injury common among growing adolescents. This syndrome is caused by inflammation of the tendon below the patella. Athletes who participate in gymnastics, basketball, running, and soccer are at increased risk for this disease. The symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter disease include swelling, knee pain, and tenderness below the knee cap.

Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain

Young, active adolescents often complain of pain in the front and center region of the knee. This is called Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain, and it is not associated with any injury or damage to the knee structures. The cause of this syndrome is not clear, but experts believe that the complex anatomy of the knee joint contributes to the problem. The knee is extremely sensitive to problems of alignment and overuse. For teens, a number of factors are thought to be involved. These include poor flexibility, imbalance of the thigh muscles, problems with alignment, improper sports training techniques, improper use of equipment, and overdoing sports activities.

Symptoms of Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain include pain that begins gradually and is worse at night, popping sounds of the knee when climbing stairs or walking after prolonged sitting, pain during activities that repeatedly bend the knee, pain that causes the knee to buckle, and pain related to change in activity level or playing surface.

Omaha Integrated Health
13906 Gold Cir Suite #200, Omaha, NE 68144
402-816-2738
https://www.omahaintegratedhealth.com

Knee injuries cause knee pain, especially for athletes. There are four major ligaments of the knee: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Also, the meniscus is commonly injured, resulting in knee pain. Other causes of knee pain include Osgood-Schlatter Disease…

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